Fazal Sheikh, Bhajan Ashram at Dawn, Vrindavan, India, 2003. © Fazal Sheikh; courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is boasting an impressive list of exhibitions and events for the month of August.  

Here is the info we were sent on what's coming up:

Krishna: Lord of Vrindavan, opening Aug. 8

A companion exhibition to Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh, Krishna: Lord of Vrindavan explores the Hindu god Krishna through sacred and secular artworks, dating from the 11th century to the 20th, from the Museum’s Asian art collection. Krishna promised followers that through bhakti (devotion) to him, one could gain moksha (salvation). The exhibition will be presented in the Museum’s Emma Eccles Jones Education Gallery.

salt 9: Jillian Mayer, closes Aug. 17

What does it mean to upload your soul to the Internet or to leave a timeless video message for your unborn grandchild? Cloaked with humor, fast editing, and pop soundtracks, Mayer's videos are designed for mass appeal but ask big questions about human connection and manufactured realities. Her work lives in, and is activated by, viewer participation. She investigates the (im)possibility of authenticity and the multiplicity of authorship by co-opting the visual language and tools of Google, online chat boards, and viral videos. Mayer uses photography, video, drawing, installation, and performance to tease out the pathways and pitfalls of postmodern identity formation while considering our increasing integration with the web and questioning the distinction between reality and the virtual world.

Lawrence Weiner: BENT TO A STRAIGHT AND NARROW AT A POINT OF PASSAGE, closes Aug. 24

A fascinating work of language sculpture by groundbreaking contemporary artist Lawrence Weiner is now on view in the UMFA G. W. Anderson Family Great Hall. Purchased by the Museum in 2011 with funds from the Phyllis Cannon Wattis Endowment for 20th Century Art,BENT TO A STRAIGHT AND NARROW AT A POINT OF PASSAGE (1976) is an important addition to the UMFA's permanent collection of contemporary art and represents a canonical moment in art history.

Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh, on view through Nov. 30

Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh weaves together the artist-activist’s portraits and the stories of a community of widows in the Hindu pilgrimage site of Vrindavan. A marginalized segment of Hindu society since ancient times, widows, many of them dispossessed of home and family, have few places of sanctuary. In Vrindavan, a city holy to the Hindu god Krishna, these women chant and pray every day in the hopes of obtaining moksha, release from the constant cycle of death and rebirth. The exhibition, comprising forty photographs by Sheikh, is on loan from the Princeton Museum of Art.

Creation and Erasure: Art of the Bingham Canyon Mine, on view through Sept. 28

Northern Utah’s Bingham Canyon Mine, the largest man-made excavation on earth, has been a source of fascination and inspiration for artists around the country since the mine’s earliest days. Spanning 1873 to the present, this exhibition presents paintings, drawings, prints and photographs that examine the mine from a variety of perspectives, tracing its physical development as well as its effects on the local economy, culture, environment, and people. Featured artists include Jonas Lie, William Rittase, Andreas Feininger, Jean Arnold, Edward Burtynsky and the Center for Land Use Interpretation, among others. The exhibition also includes photographs of the mine after the massive landslide of spring 2013, the effects of which continue to impact the mine’s operations.

Admission is $9 for adults, $7 for kids 6 and under and free for members. For more information, visit umfa.utah.edu