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    Categories: In the MagazineSnow Sports

Home Is Where You Park It.

Squaw Valley, California | Squaw Valley Resortsquawalpine.com

Arrive early to snag a spot in the Squaw Valley Resort overnight RV parking lot—the first-come, first-serve spots are very cheap ($25 per night), but also very limited and go quickly. But it’s Tahoe – so you’ll want to cut any expense you can.

Ketchum, Idaho | The Meadows RV Resortthemeadowsketchum.com

Located right at the base of the Sawtooth Mountains and the world-renowned Sun Valley Ski Resort, this no-frills campground (power and sewer is included in the $30 nightly fee, but that’s about it) boasts a million-dollar view from your front step.

Wilson, Wyoming | Jackson Hole Campground at Fireside Resortjacksonholecampground.com

At only $59 per night, a full-hookup RV site at the Jackson Hole Campground provides the amenities of the Fireside Resort at a fraction of their über-pricey rental rates for luxury cabins. Though the 15-person hot tub is a great way to unwind after a day on the slopes, the real appeal is the campground’s proximity to Q Roadhouse and Brewing Company, where you can get hearty meals like duck poutine or pork schnitzel.

Steamboat, Colorado | Steamboat KOA | koa.com

It’s just as true for RVs as it is for houses: It’s all about location, location, location. At the Steamboat KOA, you only have to fuss with parking once; after you arrive at your $50 full-hookup campsite, you can simply walk to the bus stop, where a free shuttle will take you the three miles to charming downtown Steamboat Springs, or six miles to the mountain town’s famed “champagne powder.”

Alta, Wyoming | Grand Targhee Resortgrandtarghee.com

Want the freshest powder? Grab a $20 RV pass at the front desk of the Grand Targhee Resort, and you can roll out of bed and onto the lift at first light. Keep in mind that it’s a parking lot, not an RV park, so you’ll have to do without electrical, water, or waste hookups—but that’s a small price to pay for first dibs on the mountain.

Be sure to read about the DOs and DON’Ts of Cold Weather Camping.

See more inside our 2018 Jan/Feb Issue.

Susan Lacke :