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    Categories: A & EFilm

Movie Review: Finding Your Feet

By Richard Bonaduce

Sometimes trailers spoil a movie, while others properly sell the sizzle and not the steak. But the trailer for dramedy Finding Your Feet sells a slightly different movie from the one you’ll (hopefully) see: a lighthearted predictable mix of 2011’s The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel and 2007’s Young@Heart. Although some developments are certainly overt, there’s so much more contained within its nearly two hours, including a veritable Who’s Who of beloved British actors.

Perfect casting gives us Imelda Staunton as judgmental snob Sandra and Celia Imrie as her free-spirited sister Bif, who have a natural, easy chemistry as sisters, absolutely bringing home both the love and the rivalry between them. Their stories (as ­­well as those of the supporting cast) are at once familiar and heartbreaking, giving Finding Your Feet much more grief to ground it than evidenced in the trailer. “Romantic Dramedy” seems like a phrase truly coined for a film such as this; idealistic as it is seriously funny. But that blithe trailer masking the unexpected mix of earnest and entertaining may throw off those looking for something more consistently carefree. This is more of a film showcasing people dealing with loss with as much dignity as possible, and finding their feet (and love) at an age when most of the world thinks life has passed them by.

The script—by Nick Moorcroft and first-time writer Meg Leonard—ensures every supporting character has something to do; their individual stories contributing to the whole. Director Richard Loncraine brings his considerable experience in both television and film, as well as in comedy and drama to bear; focusing on these characters’ interrelationships, and only on the amazing scenery just enough to mirror Sandra’s bourgeoning attitude. The glitzier, Hollywood elements are scaled back, used more as a metaphor than gimmick, albeit obvious ones. Admittedly, most of the film is predictable; but when done in such earnestness from such a talented cast, even telegraphed developments are satisfying.

Ultimately, Finding Your Feet both fulfills and transcends its sales-pitch, providing just as much to think about as to enjoy; and just as much to laugh at as to sob over.

  • Finding Your Feet
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Runtime: 1 hrs. 51 min.
  • MPAA Rating: PG-13
  • Director: Richard Loncraine
  • Actors:  Joanna Lumley, Imelda Staunton, Timothy Spall, Celia Imrie, David Hayman, John Sessions
Jeremy Pugh :Jeremy Pugh is Salt Lake magazine's Web Editor. He covers culture, history, theater, the outdoors and whatever else we ask him to. Jeremy is also the author of the book "100 Things to Do in Salt Lake City Before You Die" and the forthcoming history, culture and urban legend guidebook "Secret Salt Lake" (Spring 2019, Reedy Press).