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    Categories: CommunityPolitics

What Now? (Definitive Steps to take after the Women's March)

Regardless of how you feel about the Women’s March that took place on January 21, 2017, it stands out in history for being the largest protest in human history. Throngs of people (there were over half a million in Los Angeles alone) attended these marches worldwide to stand in solidarity with marginalized people and rights they say are compromised by Donald Trump’s inauguration. These crowds included activists from an array of movements, including Black Lives Matter, feminism and pro-choice—but they were not without opposition. Many people say that the marches had no objective, tangible outcome or impact on policy. So the question remains—what now? How do you best battle or support a Donald Trump presidency?

  1. Register to vote. We assume you already are, but voting turnout at this last election was approximately 55%, so better safe than sorry.
  1. Vote in local elections. So many important decisions are made at a local level rather than nation-wide. If you want your voice to be effectively heard, shout down the ballot and not just down your Facebook feed. The next election is November 6, 2018, but don’t wait till that day to get to know your representatives and research the ballot. Ballotpedia does a good job at publishing unbiased outlines of the issues on each local ballot. 
  1. Contact your representatives. Do you want to lay a brick on the wall with your bare hands, sitting beside Trump? Or do you feel that nothing is more important now than protecting Planned Parenthood and opening our borders? The best way for you to contribute to these causes is to directly let those representing you know. You can use this site to find out who represents you and then contact them accordingly to let them know which issues matter to you. Often the most successful way to do this is by phone, but emails, fax and websites work as well. The two Senators for Utah are Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee. Their contact info is below:

Orrin Hatch:

SLC Phone: 801-524-4380

SLC Address: 8402 Federal Building, 125 S State Street, SLC, UT 84138

Washington D.C. Phone: 202-224-5251

Washington D.C. Address: 104 Hart Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510

Website contact form

Mike Lee:

SLC Phone: 801-524-5933

SLC Address: Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building, 125 South State, Suite 4225, SLC, UT 84138

SLC Fax: 801-524-5730

Washington D.C. Phone: 202-224-5444

Washington D.C. Address: 361A Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510

Website contact form

  1. Follow up with the Women’s March. Conveniently, the organizers who put together the Women’s March also launched a platform to direct political action for the next 100 days that align with the views of the Women’s March. 
  1. Keep up-to-date on active legislation. Use an app like Countable or another calendar to keep fresh on what Congress is voting on. Let your representatives know your opinions on specific bills. 
  1. Connect with cause-specific organizations. If you carried a banner on either side this election, don’t just abandon it now that the inauguration is over. Countless organizations exist for change within many of the causes most common to the Women’s March. Were you passionate about a woman’s right to choose? Donate to Planned Parenthood. If you care a lot about racial equality, participate in a Black Lives Matter march or get involved with the ACLU. And for those who are particularly passionate about LGBTQ+ rights, volunteer for Utah Pride.
  1. Remember that politics are local: Pay attention to what is happening in your communities. Use local newspapers and listen to the stories of those around you.
Salt Lake Magazine :