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    Categories: Community & CultureHealthIn the MagazineLifestyle

Sex (mis) Education: Myth vs Fact (Part 3)

what we think we know

It’s better for kids to learn about sex from their parents than at school.

the truth

We’re not talking to our kids about sex at home.

30-SECOND SEX ED:

Parents don’t need an advanced degree to teach their kids about sex. Simply having the conversation is enough. Use pop culture as a springboard for discussion (“Do you think the relationship on this show is realistic? Healthy?”) Be open and frank, even when you don’t know the answer—this, too, is a teachable moment for kids to  find reliable information about sex, be it a family doctor or reputable website such as Advocates for Youth  (advocatesforyouth.org).

what we think we know

Porn is a public health crisis.

the truth

There’s a bigger problem we’re not addressing.

30-SECOND SEX ED:

When kids aren’t provided with a template for healthy sexuality, they look for one—usually on their smartphones or computers. Pornography itself isn’t the problem, and banning it isn’t the solution. Instead, the emphasis should be placed on providing children and teens with alternative images of healthy sexuality and teaching youth to think critically about the way sex is portrayed in the media.

what we think we know

The best way to lower the rates of STDs and unwanted pregnancies is simple: Don’t have sex.

the truth

Haaaaaahahahahaha!
Good one.

30-SECOND SEX ED:

Abstinence—from all forms of sexual activity—is the only guaranteed way to prevent STDs. But almost everyone has sex eventually. Providing education on STD prevention and testing can help create healthy practices that benefit personal and societal health for a lifetime.

Listen to our podcast, Salt Lake Speak‘s with Kristen Hobson for additional information.

Andrea Peterson :