Thursday, April 15, 2021

Small Lake City

Small Lake City Concerts

Welcome to Salt Lake Magazine’s Small Lake City Concert Series. Each issue we feature a local artist performing an original song and one of their favorite cover.

Alan Michael

Mid-morning at the Rabbit Hole might as well be midnight: The gas lamps flicker, barely lighting the dim corners. It seems an apt atmosphere for Utah jazzman Alan Michael, who cradles his gleaming saxophone as he talks about the jazz that is his life. Read the full interview here.

Sammy Brue

Sammy Brue is making quite a name for himself in Utah’s music scene, but that’s not always where he figured he would end up. “Before I became a musician, I was super into tennis and had a dream of becoming a professional,” says Brue. Read the full interview here.

Triggers and Slips

Up until he was 23 years old, Morgan Snow’s sole ambition was to become a professional baseball player. But after playing college ball in Myrtle Beach, S.C. and after several attempts with pro-MLB tryouts, he decided to let go of his big-league dreams. Read the full interview here.

Fur Foxen

We called Steph Darland to talk about his music. The first thing he said to me was, “Let me put you on speaker so I can talk with my hands.” Steph, guitarist, and Amber Pearson, cellist, form the duo Fur Foxen, a group that started out playing small gigs at coffeehouses like Alchemy and is now a favorite in Salt Lake clubs. Read the full interview here.

Pixie and the Partygrass Boys

Ben Weiss invited some musician friends he knew, Zach Downes and Andrew Nelson, to jam at a party for a few hours with a musician he’d never really played with, Katia Racine. “Three hours flew by,” Weiss says, “So at the end we all looked at each other and said ‘Well, we should start a band.’” And that’s how the Salt Lake-based band Pixie and the Partygrass Boys was born four years ago. Read the full interview here.

Kate MacLeod

Kate MacLeod was classically trained on the violin as a young child but now she plays the fiddle. “A fiddle costs a few hundred dollars and a violin costs a few thousand,” she jokes. “It really comes down to style. There’s no difference between the instruments.” Read the full interview here

Michelle Moonshine

Michelle Moonshine didn’t know she was a musician—she thought she just liked music. “When I was 16, I went to a music festival and met a bunch of people like Tony Holiday and Talia Keys,” she says. “I was like, ‘Wow.’ It was the first time I’d ever seen real live music, so after that I would sneak into Hog Wallow to see their shows, then I started hanging out with Tony Holiday and watching him play all the time and I started playing guitar and singing.” Read the full interview here

Mindy Gledhill

Mindy Gledhill refuses to take no for an answer. “I was really drawn to singing when I was a young teenager,” she says. “I tried out for the school musical and the chamber choir. I didn’t get into anything.” But that wasn’t the end of the story for the Provo-based singer-songwriter. “I’m a really driven person by nature, so rather than letting that determine my path, I decided to create my own path.” Gledhill got an internship at a recording studio, formed her own band that played at open mic nights and school assemblies and then went to BYU where she majored in commercial music. “I got the ball rolling myself,” she says matter-of-factly. Read the full interview here.

The Hollering Pines

Mansion of Heartbreak, the sophomore release by The Hollering Pines, presents 12 worried songs for worried times. Recorded directly to tape at Orchard Studios with production by Jay William Henderson and Ryan Tanner, Mansion of Heartbreak builds on the band’s 2012 album (Long Nights, Short Lives and Spilled Chances) by introducing a bit more grit into the grain, guiding a dark thread through a silver needle.

​Sisters Marie Bradshaw (guitar) and Kiki Jane Sieger (bass) knit their voices in the long tradition of harmonizing sisters, with instrumental backing befitting the house band at the Cosmic American Barroom—Dylan Schorer on guitars and M. Horton Smith on mandolin and guitar, Daniel Young on drums, and help from guests Ryan Tanner (piano) and Billy Contreras (fiddle). The band unfolds their sonic map on this record, with nudges from Hi Records-style horns and a new set of textures. Mansions of Heartbreak confirms the Hollering Pines’ place as a high desert rock ’n’ roll outfit committed to tracing the outer contours of Americana.

The Proper Way

The Proper Way, came about through a combination of being put on the spot by a promoter to come up with a name and Utah’s billboard campaign about the “proper way” to dispose of prescription medication. Their sound is much more difficult to define.

Visit the link to learn more about the band and read the full interview here.

Vincent Draper and The Culls

If music is Vincent Draper and the Culls’ first love, beer is their second. They belong to a genre of music known as sad bastard—a style characterized by morose tones and tender lyrics. Second, their music videos often reflect the introspective emotionality of the songs.

Kelli Moyle says she has always had music in her blood. And the voice that came out of her is raspy and soulful—and after playing the Salt Lake circuit as part of everything from punk to Americana bands, Moyle is now in the process of recording a solo album. Read the full article here.

Cinders

Utah-based, Cinders rose to fame with the help of YouTuber Alex Rainbird, who put them on one of his popular indie-music playlists. The playlist resulted in the successful funding of a Kickstarter fundraiser for the production of their first album and, subsequently, to a million streams of that album on the online music site Spotify. They are a good mix of heavy, fast, fun, light music.Their favorite description of their music is rowdy-acoustic-pop.

SIAK

Music: SIAK Video: Natalie Simpson.

“There was a time when I thought I could hear every electronic sound that was ever made,” says electro musician Chris Nielson, stage name SIAK.–

“[Electro’s] an ’80s kind of sound,” SIAK continues, “So, electro references science fiction, breakdancing, robots and the like,” and, he says, though the masses may think of electro as a European thing, the music is steeped in the history of Motown. “All techno comes from Detroit. It’s an American tradition—believe it or not.”

View the whole story here

Timmy The Teeth

Music: Timmy The Teeth– All the best. Video: Natalie Simpson.

“I wear a cowboy hat” laughs Utah County based singer-songwriter Timmy The Teeth. “A lot of times people think I’m country because of the clothes I wear. I wouldn’t say I’m country, but we have a little twang in our songs. I guess I’m just a singer of songs. What comes out, comes out”.

“I just write about what I feel or what happens in my life,” Teeth continues. “I fear that I’ll become stagnant and I won’t have anything to write about. It’s scary to become complacent or to become comfortable”.

You know it's spring in Utah when cherry blossoms are in full bloom at the @utstatecapitol ⁠🌸😍⁠

Photo by @gravesstuart
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Inspired by @oldsaltlake, we're celebrating #throwbackthursday with a favorite snapshot of early 20th century Salt Lake City. 🏖️⁠

Photos shared by @oldsaltlake are inspiring millennials and zoomers decades later with visions of a different city: one with easily accessible public transportation, walkable streets, local businesses (open late) and distinctive architecture.⁠

See more photos at the link in our bio. ⁠

Pictured: Women relax at what is believed to be Saltair Beach, date unknown
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Why did Utah's only Titanic passenger not survive her journey?⁠

The descendants of Irene Corbett believe that the 30-year-old teacher sacrificed her life to save others. It's one of the many ways this remarkable figure bucked tradition and forged her own trail.⁠

Read more about Irene at the link in our bio!
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One year ago today: a Salt Lake earthquake that even shook Moroni 👼⁠

Photo by @gravesstuart
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"We must have done something right, cause you guys kept coming back."⁠

@bluepelatedinerslc, one of Salt Lake's signature spots for everyone from hungover college kids to vegan food lovers, will be closing its doors this May after more than two decades of service. It's the latest casualty in a brutal year for the restaurant industry. ⁠

Head to the link in our bio for a tribute to Blue Plate Diner. (And keep supporting your favorite local restaurants. ❤️)
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Tony Caputo, a food evangelist and founding father of today’s SLC food community, passed away last night.⁠

Tony started @caputosmarket in 1997, bringing his passion for the cuisine of his heritage to Utah tables. Most days during the lunch rush you’d find Tony behind the counter slicing meat and cheeses and then, after it wound down, holding court out front. He’d often rush back behind the counter and holler over his shoulder, “you have to try this!" only to return with a sample bite of veiny cheese, a paper-thin leaf of prosciutto or a perfectly crisp amaretti cookie that he’d recently added to his menagerie of taste. For his many contributions to Salt Lake City, we awarded Tony with a Lifetime Achievement Dining Award in 2007.⁠

Today, we're sending love to @caputosmarket and the many people whose lives were touched by Tony. A full tribute is on our website now. ❤️
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Why is the Pleasant Grove theme park Evermore suing one of the most powerful women in music? Long story short: a playground for those who would choose lore over folklore is taking on Taylor Swift over the name of her most recent album. Both parties have their reputation on the line in a battle of undercover Swifties and novelty mug disputes. Will Evermore hit the gold rush? Or did they cross the wrong mad woman? The full story is at the link in our bio. ...

Even in the exploration boom of the 1800s, nobody dared to explore the terrain flowing through the Green and the Colorado Rivers.⁠

That is, nobody until Major John W. Powell said the 19th Century equivalent of “Hey man, hold my beer while I try this.”⁠

Read more about his dangerous expedition at the link in our bio!⁠

Photo of Powell’s expedition courtesy Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division⁠
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A brand new issue of Salt Lake magazine is coming your way! ⁠

We can't wait to share these stories with you. This issue includes our annual Blue Plate Awards celebrating those surviving and thriving in the restaurant biz. Plus, we take a road trip to Wyoming and ask why the only Utah passenger on the Titanic didn’t survive her journey.⁠

A note from our editor Jeremy Pugh, including beautiful tributes to Mary Brown Malouf from our friends in the community, is online now. Read more at the link in our bio ❤️⁠

Subscribers: Look for this issue in your mailbox soon. The magazine will be on newsstands March 1! 📬
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Today, we are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2021 Blue Plate Awards! ⁠🎉⁠

These prizes honor the growers, food evangelists, grocers, servers, bakers, chefs, bartenders and restaurateurs who do more than put good food on the table—they make our community a better place to live. This year, just surviving as a local business deserves an award, but each of our Blue Plate winners did more than that. They made us grateful for every person involved in the essential act of feeding us.⁠ 🍽⁠

At the link in our bio, we have the full list of winners, a celebration of feats of COVID creativity and a tribute to restaurants we lost this year. If you’re hungry for more, pick up a copy on newsstands March 1! Plus, check out our Instagram for spotlights on some of the Blue Plate winners. ⁠

This year’s Blue Plate Awards are the first without our beloved Executive Editor Mary Brown Malouf. We dedicate them to her, our town’s biggest food fan, critic and champion. xoxomm⁠ 💙
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2021 Blue Plate Award winner: @ricobrandut for Staying in Beansness⁠

Last summer, it seemed that Rico would be another victim of rapid gentrification in Salt Lake. Luckily, Rico was able to find a new home in Poplar Grove and now plans to add even more employees. It’s a last-minute happy ending for a community leader who literally wears his mission on his sleeve, courtesy a tattoo in bright red block letters: “pay it forward.” 💙⁠
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2021 Blue Plate Award Winner: @spicekitchenincubator for Keeping the Spice Flowing⁠

This year Spice Kitchen Incubator, already an essential resource for refugees, became, well, even more essential. 💙⁠
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2021 Blue Plate Award winner: @thestore_utah for Special Deliveries ⁠

As grocery delivery becomes the new norm, The Store offers a personal touch that only an independent grocer can provide. Last March, high-risk and elderly customers began calling in their grocery lists over the phone, and The Store’s general managers personally delivered food to their homes. 💙⁠
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2021 Blue Plate Award winner: @cucinaslc for Preserving Neighborhood Connection⁠

Cucina’s outdoor spaces became a place where the neighborhood could gather safely. Owner Dean Pierose offered free coffee in the mornings and encouraged his regulars to linger and commiserate together, preserving a semblance of society during a socially distanced time. 💙⁠
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2021 Blue Plate Award winner: @fisherbrewing for Creative Canning⁠

This year, Fisher found ways to utilize their beer, taproom space and canning capabilities for good. They created special lines of limited edition beers in custom cans to help raise funds for local businesses struggling to stay afloat during the pandemic. 💙⁠
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