Summertime slush—soft cold slurpy sweet treats—are the classic seasonal delight. Here’s where to get the best and how to make them yourself.

Ice Cream Cereal 

What it is:

A legacy of the cereal-crazed 80’s, when every young adult comedy (think Seinfeld) had characters standing around eating cereal and Cap’n Crunch was the preferred coders’ snack, Ice cream with cereal toppings is kind of a genius combo, taking sugared cereals off the breakfast table where they belong: in a dessert, of course!

Who does it best:

Spilled Milk Ice Cream and Cereal Bar, a food truck that does what it says. Find them on Facebook, here.

How to do it yourself:

Could it be any easier? Make an ice cream cone, any flavor. Stick cereal— Fruity Pebbles are a favorite—coat your ice cream and crunch away

Hawaiian Shave Ice 

What it is:

Shaved ice—usually called shave ice— is finer than the ice used in sno-cones, softer so it melts on the tongue. It has a long history—some date its origin to 7th century Taiwan. The Japanese who came to work in Hawaiian sugar plantations brought shaved ice along with them and it became a signature island treat. Now it’s everywhere.

Who does it best:

Hokulia Shaved Ice, 1501 N. Canyon Rd., Provo, 801-602-6683. There are several Utah locations in this nationwide chain. Hokuliashaveice.com

How to do it yourself:

Process 6 cups of ice, 2 cups at a time, until they are ne, not crunchy. Use the pulse function to do this. Place a scoop of ice cream in each serving dish, top with shaved ice and drizzle with flavored syrup (Simmer 1 pound of pitted peeled plums with 1⁄2 cup sugar and 1 tablespoon lemon juice until sugar has dissolved; cook further about 20 minutes. Strain and chill until ready to use.) or sweetened condensed milk. Sprinkle with coconut flakes.

Milkshake 

What it is:

To be clear, there are two kinds of milkshakes—the soft-serve one served at fast food restaurants that is so thick you can’t suck it through a straw and the one made with scooped ice cream and milk. We call these “real” milkshakes, but we like both.

Who does it best:

Iceberg Drive Inn opened in 1960 and at first served “real” milkshakes, developing a reputation for innovative flavors. But customers requested a thicker shake, and owner Lamar Scrensen Developed the Famous Thick Shake, so thick it stands inches above the rim of the cup. A raspberry shake from Iceberg is a definitive Utah treat. Tonyburgers serves the best “real” milkshake in town. Made with scoops of ice cream blended with milk and flavoring, you can suck it up through a straw and drive a car at the same time!

How to do it yourself:

To make a thick shake like the ones at Iceberg Drive Inn, you really need special equipment. But to make a real milk shake, just bring out the blender. Let your ice cream soften a bit before using. Place 4 scoops in a blender with 1/4 cup of whole milk and a few drops of vanilla. Blend, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides, until it’s as thick as you like it. It’s pretty to top it with whipped cream and a cherry, but thats up to you!

Frozen Coffee

What it is:

It’s Starbuck’s fault—iced co ee got all dressed up with a lot of avorings. But you may be able to make this better at home if you follow The Chunky Chef’s Recipe Below.

Who does it best:

Red Moose Coffee Company. Most of their extensive coffee menu can be made frozen!

How to do it yourself:

Pour 2 cups brewed coffee into ice cube trays and freeze. Blend the coffee ice with 2 cups milk, 4 Tbsp. chocolate syrup and 3 Tbsp. sugar and blend until slushy. Top with whipped cream and a drizzle of chocolate syrup.

Bubble Tea 

What it is:

Invented in Taiwan in the 1980s, bubble or boba tea is tea, with or without milk, with tapioca balls in it. There are lots of versions—you can use black, green or oolong tea; coconut milk, almond milk, cow’s milk (skim or whole, condensed milk.)

Who does it best:

Tea Bar, 1201 Wilmington Ave., SLC, 385-322-2120. facebook.com/TEABARUTAH

How to do it yourself:

To brew your tea, measure 2 tablespoons e of black tea in 2 1⁄2 cups of water. Let steep 5 minutes, then strain. Mix together 1⁄4 cup hot water and 1⁄4 cup dark brown sugar; stir until dissolved over low heat. Boil 4 cups of water, add tapioca balls. In a few minutes, they’ll float to the top. Then cover and cook about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Basically tapioca is like a pasta made from cassava root and different brands have different instructions. Do what the box tells you to! Strain the boba and pour the brown sugar syrup over it. Let steep for a few minutes and cool. Put the boba in a glass. Top with tea and finish with a dollop of lightly whipped, unsweetened cream!

Frozen Margarita

What it is:

The classic tequila and lime cocktail transformed into slush. The frozen margarita was invented by Mariano Martinez a Mexican American inventor, entrepreneur, and restaurateur in Dallas, Texas, in 1971, he adapted a soft serve ice cream machine to making margaritas and college has never been the same since. Purists may prefer the original drink, shaken and strained into a coupe, but on hot summer days there’s a lot to be said for a frozen ‘rita.

Who does it best:

Chile-Tepin, 307 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-883-9255.

How to do it yourself:

You really need a heavy duty high-speed blender like a Vitamix to get the right consistency for a frozen margarita or there’s no point in making one—this is a party drink. Put 3⁄4 cup tequila, 1.2 cup Triple Sec, 2 Tablespoons agave nectar (blends better than sugar) and 3⁄4 cup fresh lime juice in the blender with about 4 cups of ice and let’er rip. Salt the rims of your glasses by dipping the rim into a saucer of lime juice, then a saucer of salt, pour in the drink carefully and garnish with a lime wheel.

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